Welcome to Northwest Sickle Cell Collaborative

The NWSCC makes life better for children and families with sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait. 

Families

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Families

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Health Care Providers

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Health Care Providers

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Community

Local non-profits, service providers, and upcoming events

Community

Local non-profits, service providers, and upcoming events

Information

About Sickle Cell Disease

Normal red blood cells are round, almost like doughnuts. They move  through small blood vessels in the body to deliver oxygen, which is  carried by a substance called hemoglobin. In sickle cell disease, one  little change in the hemoglobin can cause it to form long rods when it  gives away oxygen. These rigid rods change the round red cells into  hard, sticky sickle shapes. When these hard and pointed red cells go  through the small blood tube, they clog the flow and break apart. This  can cause pain, damage and a low blood count, or anemia.  

About Sickle Cell Trait

 A person with sickle cell trait carries one sickle hemoglobin-producing  gene inherited from their parents and one normal hemoglobin gene. (Genes  are made up of DNA molecules, which are the simplest building blocks of  heredity. They are grouped together in specific patterns, forming the  unique "blueprint" for every physical and biological characteristic of  that person.) People with sickle cell trait do not have or contract  sickle cell disease. However, if they have a child with another person  who has sickle cell trait or other genetic conditions, that child may  have sickle cell disease.  

How do you get Sickle Cell Disease?

 You inherit the abnormal hemoglobin from your parents. Often both  parents are carriers with sickle cell trait, but they could also have  sickle cell disease or other blood conditions. You cannot catch sickle  cell, and no one can catch it from you. You are born with the sickle  cell hemoglobin and it is present for life. If you have sickle cell  trait it means you inherit a sickle gene from one parent, and a normal  hemoglobin gene from the other. If you have the disease it means you  have sickle hemoglobin, but no normal hemoglobin gene. This can be  because you have two sickle genes (one from each parent), or one sickle  gene, and another type of abnormal hemoglobin gene.
 

Contact Us

We would like to hear from you!

Northwest Sickle Cell Collaborative Hotline

Leave us a voicemail and someone will return your call within 2 business days.

(206) 987-5879